James Sohre

Jim Sohre serves as full-time General Director for Opera Las Vegas, for which he has devised and directed such events as Bravo, Bernstein!, A Passion for Puccini, Viva Verdi! , Latin Fiesta, and Bravo, Bernstein! at the Smith Center Cabaret Jazz; Who’s Afraid of Opera?, Carmen and Rigoletto Informances tours to area schools;  Britten’s Noye’s Fludde (Noah’s Flood) to local churches; Stars of David, saluting Jewish-American opera stars at Temple Sinai; family friendly operatic versions of Pinocchio, The Three Little Pigs, and Jack and the Beanstalk to library theatres; and various other thematic performances like Divas in Diamonds, Operatic Spook-takular, Our Three Tenors, Holiday on Broadway, Beer and Baritones, Opera Legends in Black, Dueling Pianos and Cinderella’s Diamond Ball which performed at the historic Liberace Mansion.

Jim travels throughout North America and Europe regularly to review performances for Opera Today, and Music and Vision among other publications. He is a founding member of the Las Vegas Valley Theatre Awards program. He completed a 40-year civilian career with the Army Entertainment program, most of it spent as the Chief for the European Region.  He was the longtime chair of the International Committee for the Association of Community Theatre (AACT).

He has directed and/or served as music director for more than 200 productions, including Les Miserables, The Addams Family, Something’s Afoot, The Fantasticks, Hairspray, The Producers, The Drowsy Chaperone, and many others. He has a Bachelor of Arts in Music from the University of Wisconsin and a Master’s Degree in Theatre from Tulsa University.

He has received multiple awards from the U.S. Army for his work improving the quality of life for soldiers, and from AACT for “promotion and development of the highest standards for community theatre.”  He has adjudicated theatre festivals in Germany, Japan, Canada, and the United States and is the recipient of the Mort Clark International Theatre Award.  His achievements have been honored with a dedicated chair at the National Theatre in Washington, DC.